Search this site:             

Can you cook your own food and drinks on Mt. Fuji?

by Crystie
(Missoula, Montana)

I know there are huts and vending machines to get food and drinks, but I worry about my strange allergies...so can I use my backpacking stove on the mountain?

I know they say no fire, but mine is a gas stove that produces a single flame. So can I make my own food and drink?

Comments for Can you cook your own food and drinks on Mt. Fuji?

Average Rating starstarstarstarstar

Click here to add your own comments

Jan 23, 2016
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Stove + wind = :-(
by: Roger

Hi Crystie,

I climbed Mt Fuji twice by two different trails (one last year). I can assure you that the strong wind and low temperatures will make you stay still when you'll do your stop at huts. If doing the climbing by daylight you'll probably want to drink fresh and stay only a little time around each hut because as Gary said it's very crowded and there are few spots to sit. Sandwiches and energy bars are enough (if you don't suffer from altitude sickness ... otherwise you'll probably not be very hungry)

If you go up by night starting around 21:00 or 22:00, it will be more wind and it will be cold too. No need to take your gloves out of your pockets, just enjoy eating energy bars and dry fruits. Last tip: if climbing by night, don't buy cold water in Kawaguchiko or Tokyo. Normal water will be OK (40° in Tokyo in summer) ... your water will be perfect when climbing up and your throat will not be "damaged" when drinking.

Conclusion: no need to take stove and cooking food. Enjoy the view and have a safe climb.

Roger


Jan 09, 2016
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Maybe no problem...
by: Gary Wolff

Crystie, I'm not aware of any restrictions on stoves, but the problem you might have is finding a place to set it down. Most trail sections are quite narrow, and although some huts have a few outside benches or small tables where you can sit and rest for free as you hike past, during peak climbing times & while you're still headed up (or down), you may have trouble locating a level spot to fire up your stove. But maybe no problem anywhere around the summit crater.

Another option is that some huts sell hot water, so if you don't actually have to "cook" your food, e.g. you're eating/drinking something like instant ramen, cocoa, tea, instant coffee, or any of the instant, freeze-dried meal packets you can pick up at outdoor shops, etc., maybe you can leave your stove behind. :-)

Happy trails...

p.s. I LOVE Montana! I spent the summer of 1990 working in Glacier Natl. Park...

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Climbing Mt. Fuji.

Tokyo Weather/Sky
Click for Tokyo, Japan Forecast
Click for Tokyo, Japan Forecast




Let's connect!!

Gary J. Wolff


View Gary J. Wolff's profile on LinkedIn

My pics:

My videos: YouTube logo