Search this site:             

Can you give me some advice on the Kamikochi to Daikiretto to Yarigatake circuit?

by Rocky
(Australia)

Hi Gary,

I read your article on your adventure at Daikiretto and was wondering if you could give me some guidance or advice on doing the climb. I'm heading to Japan this October and I'm planning to see the alps and hopefully go up to Daikiretto and Yarigatake. I'm just starting to plan the hike and I'm finding it hard to find info for this particular hike.

I've been to Kamikochi a few years ago but I went in at the end of autumn and I spent limited days there, so this time I want to do a slow paced hike and spend about a week there. Would you mind giving me some advice on how I should go around for this trek? I read on your article it's possible to start at the Shin-Hotaka ropeway, but I think I want to do a circuit and go from Kamikochi, to Daikiretto and Yarigatake, then finish at Shin-Hotaka and spend a night in Takayama. I appreciate any help or advice you can give me, thank you for your time!

Kind Regards,
Rocky

Comments for Can you give me some advice on the Kamikochi to Daikiretto to Yarigatake circuit?

Average Rating starstarstarstarstar

Click here to add your own comments

Jul 05, 2015
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
I'm glad to have heard your advice
by: Rocky

Thanks for the tips, Gary. I just had the pleasure of reading through your website and it contains a lot of useful info. I'm going to play it safe and hike to Oku-hotaka-dake and play it by ear once I reach near the Daikiretto region. If its too dangerous I will simply turn back this way I can at least spend a few leisurely days at the huts there before turning back to Kamikochi.

I also have a huge fear of heights and I almost fell of a ledge not long ago from vertigo and this was going to be something I hope to conquer during the trip but it may very well be too much for me to handle. Either way I'm glad to have heard your advice, thanks again and hope you continue to have grand adventures.

Rocky


Jul 05, 2015
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
I won't be doing the Daikiretto ever again.
by: Gary Wolff

Again, I haven't done that route since 1994, but the only part of the trail that scared me nearly sh*tless was going DOWN the Daikiretto. I'm certainly no "expert" climber, and have very little experience both here & in the states doing technical climbing. But it's safe to say, I won't be doing the Daikiretto ever again. :-)

The folks in the Hiking in Japan group @ Facebook are very helpful & supportive, so you might want to think about posting your questions there as well, to get other opinions.

Hope you have an awesome trip, mate...

Gazza

p.s. Here are the closing dates last year for the Kamikochi area mountain huts: www.garyjwolff.com/mt-oku-hotaka-dake-and-mt-yari-ga-take.html#closing

Jul 05, 2015
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Did you and others around have extensive experience prior the Daikiretto traverse?
by: Rocky

Hi Gary,

I appreciate your help and if you don't mind, I'd like to add on my follow up question. I got a reply from an experienced hiker and he advised me that the Yari - Daikiretto - Karasawa traverse is strictly for expert climbers. I have to admit that while I'm reasonably fit I have no experience in technical climbing. I know this traverse doesn't require technical equipments, did you and others around have extensive experience prior the Daikiretto traverse?

I will obviously take all the precautions and use my common sense. I was hoping this would be a challenge for me or do you feel that its more of a death wish for anyone who is not an "expert"? I'll also be carrying the medium rucksack and I wanted to ask you whether the traverse will have room for movement with a pack or is it most likely going to catch on some rocks?

Thanks again for your help Gary.

Rocky


Jul 05, 2015
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Pack as little as possible, without jeopardizing safety
by: Gary Wolff

Rocky, I'm not a big fan of big packs, and thru the years it always amazed me how small the packs are for the average Japanese alpinist. I think it's fair to say, they've got ultralight hiking down to an exact science. :-)

Of course, staying @ the huts allows you to leave home the tent, sleeping bag, days and days of food, and even the cook stove, although that'd obviously be nice to have around for emergencies.

I'd recommend you pack as little as possible, without jeopardizing safety, especially if you're planning to go up or down the Daikiretto.

Jul 05, 2015
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Will it be feasible to have a big rucksack while scrambling?
by: Rocky

Sorry I forgot to ask you one more thing. I'm going to hike with a rucksack and right now its a medium size 58L loaded to about to 10kg/22lb. Is the climb extremely dangerous throughout the traverse or will it be feasible to have a big rucksack while scrambling? I've been looking at some pictures and it seems that some hikers are carrying a rather large pack, would love to read your opinion on it.


Jul 05, 2015
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Is it possible to do the route relying on the mountain huts?
by: Rocky

Sorry I forgot to mention I am travelling with a medium sized pack and I want to avoid bringing a sleeping bag and tent. Is it possible to do the route relying on the mountain huts? I may even spend an extra day on several huts just to enjoy the scenery, so I have no plan on rushing it. Beautiful pictures on your trek btw. It really convinced me to want to go there!


Jul 05, 2015
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Take a leisurely pace and enjoy the scenery
by: Gary Wolff

Howdy, Rocky. I haven't hiked in the Kamikochi area in over 2 decades, so I wouldn't consider myself to be a very reliable source of info. :-)

Besides the climbing info on my site, you might try Wes Lang's hikinginjapan.com site and his "Hiking in Japan" Facebook group: www.facebook.com/groups/9872778764/

Yes, I agree that it's a good idea to take a leisurely pace and enjoy the scenery. I've scaled all of Japan's 29 highest peaks and never taken a tent or sleeping bag, so mountain huts are definitely the way to go. They appreciate advance reservations if possible and be careful about closing dates, as October is borderline a little late in the season.

Oh, and be prepared for snowstorms. Anytime from early Oct. has the risk of encountering the white stuff. Oct. is also in the midst of typhoon season, so be sure to stay abreast of the latest weather forecasts.

Have a great hike...

Cheers,
Gazza

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Mt. Oku-hotaka-dake & Mt. Yari-ga-take.

Tokyo Weather/Sky
Click for Tokyo, Japan Forecast
Click for Tokyo, Japan Forecast




Let's connect!!

Gary J. Wolff


View Gary J. Wolff's profile on LinkedIn

My pics:

My videos: YouTube logo