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What is the definition of "highest peak"?

by Dave

Hi Gary. I am quite similar to you in that I usually make some sort of summer pilgrimage to the Japanese Alps and I was just wondering what the definition of highest peak is.

I have just returned from doing Hirogawara - Kita-dake - Ai-no-dake - Nishi-Notori-dake - Notori-dake - Narata Onsen and they are all above 3000 metres, yet Nishi-Notori and Notori-dake are not in your list.

Is it because they are part of the range of other mountains or something like that? Just wondering, that's all!


p.s. Also do you have any suggestions for next summer? I heard there is a mountain onsen somewhere up near Kurobegoro-dake?


Congrats, Dave, on what sounds like a great hike.

You raise a great question. Some countries/states use proximity and a term called "prominence," or the elevation rise from the connecting saddle to the adjacent peak to determine if it's actually a distinct peak in its own right. For example, Colorado uses 300 ft. and Alaska uses 500 ft. More on prominence here:

So I'm not sure why at least one of those peaks didn't make the cut. But if it's any consolation, both Notori-dake and Nishi-Notori-dake made the list of 200 Famous Mountains in Japan. :-)

Just returned back this afternoon from climbing Mt. Jonen-dake where I was afforded the most striking view of Mt. Yari-ga-take, and perhaps the best mtn. view I've ever seen in the Japan Alps.

As for next summer, one of my favorites (and most difficult) was Mt. Kashimayari-dake, and if you do it in the direction I did, you'll have an onsen waiting for you at the bottom. :-)

Thanks for connecting....


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